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Not-So-Quick Fix: ADHD Behavioral Therapy May Be More Effective Than Drugs, Says Child Development Institute.

 



(Medical-NewsWire.com, June 06, 2012 ) Orange, CA -- The recent article was based on findings of the April 2012 Experimental Biology meeting held in San Diego. At the conclusion of the meeting a consensus opinion was formed based on a new synthesis of behavioral, cognitive and pharmacological findings. According to Scientific American summary, the basic conclusion was:



“Behavioral and cognitive therapies focused on reducing impulsivity and reinforcing positive long-term habits may be able to replace current high doses of stimulant treatment in children and young adults”.



However, this does not mean that all children, teens and adults with a diagnosis of ADHD can be successful in life without taking any medication. The conclusion instead suggests that a combination of lower doses of medication combined with behavioral and cognitive therapy may produce better long-term benefits than medication alone.



In fact, independent research and current professional guidelines for the treatment of ADHD in children suggest that individuals with mild to moderate symptoms should be started on psychological treatment first with medication added only if needed after an adequate trial on the behavioral and cognitive interventions.



The article ends with a note of caution:



“The trick will be identifying which of the new therapies is most effective, and making those therapies affordable. For now, stimulant medications are much cheaper and act faster than behavioral therapy, even if the latter may be the most effective in the long run. But experts as well as parents know that the long run is what matters most.”



One possible solution that thousands of parents have turned to is Total Focus - a comprehensive, multimedia, home-use treatment program using behavioral and cognitive interventions that have been found to be effective by scientific research.



The program was developed by child psychologist Robert Myers and is based on a successful outpatient group treatment program developed for a regional health plan in California.



After a thorough review of the program, a recognized ADHD researcher concluded, “In a nutshell, I am most impressed with this program, which incorporates a wealth of extremely helpful information and programming, derived largely from evidence-based practice presented in an extremely user-friendly format for the families of children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)”.



The program costs less than one visit to a mental health professional or around two months on many common ADHD medications.



The ADD behavioral program provides parent education, a behavior modification program, cognitive behavioral therapy, relaxation-biofeedback training, social skills training and brain training (cognitive rehabilitation exercises) and many other useful resources.



It ensures that Parents and children work as a team to produce positive changes in behavior at home and at school, as well as achieve improved academic potential.



More information about the Total Focus ADD Behavioral Program can be found here.





******

About Total Focus:



Total Focus is a multi-media program that provides what health professionals refer to as Evidence-based Treatment (based on scientific research).



The program is delivered via a CD with an interactive workbook, daily success charts for teachers and a handy “stress meter” to help every child recognize when he’s “over the top” and stay calm under stress. The program works with both parents and their children.



Both the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) professional guidelines for best practice treatment of ADHD / ADD state that medication should be used in conjunction with psychological interventions for best over-all results.



The guidelines also state that for children with mild to moderate ADHD symptoms, it may be advisable to try psychological interventions first before adding medication.



Total Focus

Robert Myers, PHD

robertm@childdevelop

info@10acne.com

Source: EmailWire.Com

Source: EmailWire.com


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