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Family Physicians Group First Recognized Patient-Centered Medical Homes by NCQA

(EMAILWIRE.COM, April 27, 2012 ) Apopka, Fla. -- Family Physicians Group is pleased to announce that the Family Physicians of Apopka location is one of the first medical practices in Central Florida to be recognized as a patient-centered medical home by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). NCQA is a national non-profit organization that recognizes health care organizations for their programs.



NCQA designated the following all Family Physicians Group offices as Level 3 recognized practices, the highest level granted by the organization. In order to be recognized, Family Physicians Group needed to showcase its high standards in six broad categories and 152 specific factors. The categories include:



- Enhance Access and Continuity

- Indentify and manage patient population

- Plan and manage care

- Provide self-care support and community resources

- Track and coordinate care

- Measure and improve performance



"Since our inception, we've operated as a patient-centered medical home, providing complete care to our patients and coordinating their care throughout the medical process," says Dr. Nayana Vyas, owner of Family Physicians Group. "The NCQA recognizing FPG as a patient-centered medical home is a tremendous honor and validates the work our team has done to provide the best health care in Central Florida."



About Family Physicians Group

With over 120 physicians from Jacksonville to St. Petersburg, Orlando-based Family Physicians Group is a leader in personal physician services in Florida. The group, which was established in 1987, focuses on a patient-centered medical home model, which concentrates on the integration and coordination of care for illness prevention and management of diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease and others. For more information, please visit www.fpg-florida.com



###

Contact:

Alan Byrd

Alan Byrd & Associates

alan@byrdconnnections.com

407-415-8470



Family Physicians Group
Alan Byrd
407-415-8470
alan@byrdconnections.com

Source: EmailWire.com


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